2019 historical fiction reading challenge

Next year I’m excited to participate in the Historical Fiction Reading Challenge, hosted by Amy at Pages to the Past.

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I found out about the challenge through Christopher’s blog, and it sounds like a great way to read more of a genre I’m not very familiar with. One of my goals in 2019 is to expand my tastes and discover new favorite genres, so this challenge comes at the perfect time.

The rules are simple. You read as much historical fiction as you want throughout the year, while aiming toward reaching a certain reading level. The levels are as follows:

20th Century Reader – 2 books
Victorian Reader – 5 books
Renaissance Reader – 10 books
Medieval – 15 books
Ancient History – 25 books
Prehistoric – 50+ books

Each month a post will be created on Amy’s website where you and other participants can post links to reviews of historical fiction; there’s no obligation to post each month, and any subgenre of historical fiction is accepted.

I’m hoping to meet the Victorian Reader challenge level (5 books). I’ll be trying out as many new genres as possible in 2019, and I don’t want to overcommit myself to historical fiction. If I meet the goal earlier than anticipated, I’ll definitely aim for a higher level.

Are you planning on participating in any reading challenges in 2019?

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22 thoughts on “2019 historical fiction reading challenge

  1. Sounds fun. But I’m trying to figure out what prehistoric fiction is? Also, I was an English Major with a focus on the Middle Ages and there isn’t that much there either. I wondered if the numbers were a joke?

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    1. I was momentarily forgetting that the works would not be written in the era. Duh. Still, do that many writers set their stories in the prehistoric era?

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      1. Haha, I made the same mistake when I first read the challenge. Very cool that you studied English with a focus on the Middle Ages! I love the period as well.

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  2. It looks like a fun challenge. Somehow I find it difficult to find books set in prehistorical ancient times which I know I would like. Perhaps few people can produce the setting since it undoubtedly requires a lot of research. Victorian novels or books set at that time are the easiest for me to find, read and love.

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    1. I’ve also enjoyed the Victorian novels that I’ve read, from Eliot to Dickens, and I might start with some books set during that time period, which is definitely an interesting one.

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    1. Sounds like you have a year of great series ahead of you! Partnering up with another blogger to take on Mercedes Lackey’s books should be a lot of fun. I haven’t done any buddy reads since college, but I remember them as helpful in keeping me on track to finish everything.

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  3. Fantastic idea. Interestingly, there’s a lot more that qualifies as “historical fiction” than might first seem to be the case; the usual standard is anything set sixty years or more before the novel’s original publication date (taken from the subtitle of Sir Walter Scott’s Waverley, generally considered to be the daddy of the genre: “Tis Sixty Years Hence”). Some of my favourite books of 2018 have been literary historical fiction – I’m confident you’ll find some great stuff!

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    1. I really hope so! I’d never known what the standard was for something to be considered historical fiction, but that’s interesting to learn. I came across Maryse Condé’s historical epics through another blogger earlier in the fall, and I’ll probably start with her work.

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