on anticipation (ix)

For this week of Nonfiction November I’ll be reading an eclectic mix of literary journalism and cultural criticism, from Susan Orlean’s The Library Book to Zadie Smith’s Feel Free: Essays.

While I focused mostly on books relating to Universal Basic Income last week, I’m excited to pivot to cultural criticism and literary journalism, two of my favorite genres of nonfiction. I’ll be reading Zadie Smith’s Feel Free: Essays, Eula Biss’s On Immunity, Leslie Jamison’s The Empathy Exams, and Susan Orlean’s The Library Book. I’ve enjoyed all of these writers’ work in the past, in print and online, and I’m excited to have the chance to check out more of their books.

Synopses for each of the books, taken from Goodreads, are included below.

fullsizeoutput_2b9d(1) Feel Free by Zadie Smith

Arranged into five sections – In the World, In the Audience, In the Gallery, On the Bookshelf, and Feel Free – this new collection poses questions we immediately recognize. What is The Social Network, and Facebook itself, really about? “It’s a cruel portrait of us: 500 million sentient people entrapped in the recent careless thoughts of a Harvard sophomore.” Why do we love libraries? “Well-run libraries are filled with people because what a good library offers cannot be easily found elsewhere: an indoor public space in which you do not have to buy anything in order to stay.” What will we tell our granddaughters about our collective failure to address global warming? “So I might say to her, look: the thing you have to appreciate is that we’d just been through a century of relativism and deconstruction, in which we were informed that most of our fondest-held principles were either uncertain or simple wishful thinking, and in many areas of our lives we had already been asked to accept that nothing is essential and everything changes and this had taken the fight out of us somewhat.”

Gathering in one place for the first time previously unpublished work, as well as already classic essays, such as, Joy, and, Find Your Beach, Feel Free offers a survey of important recent events in culture and politics, as well as Smith’s own life. Equally at home in the world of good books and bad politics, Brooklyn-born rappers and the work of Swiss novelists, she is by turns wry, heartfelt, indignant, and incisive and never any less than perfect company. This is literary journalism at its zenith.

fullsizeoutput_2b9e(2) On Immunity by Eula Biss

Upon becoming a new mother, Eula Biss addresses a chronic condition of fear–fear of the government, the medical establishment, and what is in your child’s air, food, mattress, medicine, and vaccines. She finds that you cannot immunize your child, or yourself, from the world.

In this bold, fascinating book, Biss investigates the metaphors and myths surrounding our conception of immunity and its implications for the individual and the social body. As she hears more and more fears about vaccines, Biss researches what they mean for her own child, her immediate community, America, and the world, both historically and in the present moment. She extends a conversation with other mothers to meditations on Voltaire’s Candide, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, Susan Sontag’s AIDS and Its Metaphors, and beyond.

On Immunity is a moving account of how we are all interconnected-our bodies and our fates.

(3) The Empathy Exams by Leslie Jamison

Beginning with her experience as a medical actor who was paid to act out symptoms for medical students to diagnose, Leslie Jamison’s visceral and revealing essays ask essential questions about our basic understanding of others: How should we care about each other? How can we feel another’s pain, especially when pain can be assumed, distorted, or performed? Is empathy a tool by which to test or even grade each other? By confronting pain—real and imagined, her own and others’—Jamison uncovers a personal and cultural urgency to feel. She draws from her own experiences of illness and bodily injury to engage in an exploration that extends far beyond her life, spanning wide-ranging territory—from poverty tourism to phantom diseases, street violence to reality television, illness to incarceration—in its search for a kind of sight shaped by humility and grace.

fullsizeoutput_2b9c(4) The Library Book by Susan Orlean

On the morning of April 28, 1986, a fire alarm sounded in the Los Angeles Public Library. As the moments passed, the patrons and staff who had been cleared out of the building realized this was not the usual fire alarm. As one fireman recounted, “Once that first stack got going, it was ‘Goodbye, Charlie.’” The fire was disastrous: it reached 2000 degrees and burned for more than seven hours. By the time it was extinguished, it had consumed four hundred thousand books and damaged seven hundred thousand more. Investigators descended on the scene, but more than thirty years later, the mystery remains: Did someone purposefully set fire to the library—and if so, who?

Weaving her lifelong love of books and reading into an investigation of the fire, award-winning New Yorker reporter and New York Times bestselling author Susan Orlean delivers a mesmerizing and uniquely compelling book that manages to tell the broader story of libraries and librarians in a way that has never been done before.

In The Library Book, Orlean chronicles the LAPL fire and its aftermath to showcase the larger, crucial role that libraries play in our lives; delves into the evolution of libraries across the country and around the world, from their humble beginnings as a metropolitan charitable initiative to their current status as a cornerstone of national identity; brings each department of the library to vivid life through on-the-ground reporting; studies arson and attempts to burn a copy of a book herself; reflects on her own experiences in libraries; and reexamines the case of Harry Peak, the blond-haired actor long suspected of setting fire to the LAPL more than thirty years ago.

Along the way, Orlean introduces us to an unforgettable cast of characters from libraries past and present—from Mary Foy, who in 1880 at eighteen years old was named the head of the Los Angeles Public Library at a time when men still dominated the role, to Dr. C.J.K. Jones, a pastor, citrus farmer, and polymath known as “The Human Encyclopedia” who roamed the library dispensing information; from Charles Lummis, a wildly eccentric journalist and adventurer who was determined to make the L.A. library one of the best in the world, to the current staff, who do heroic work every day to ensure that their institution remains a vital part of the city it serves.

Brimming with her signature wit, insight, compassion, and talent for deep research, The Library Book is Susan Orlean’s thrilling journey through the stacks that reveals how these beloved institutions provide much more than just books—and why they remain an essential part of the heart, mind, and soul of our country. It is also a master journalist’s reminder that, perhaps especially in the digital era, they are more necessary than ever.

8 thoughts on “on anticipation (ix)

  1. Excited to hear your thoughts on The Library Book and Feel Free, I liked that one too. I loved another book of Eula Biss’s essays, Notes from No Man’s Land but not familiar with On Immunity, interested to hear how that one is. I really admire her writing. Looks like you have a great reading week ahead!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m almost done with Feel Free, and I’ve definitely enjoyed it. The essays in the last section have been consistently strong – I admire how Smith can move smoothly among serious and lighthearted topics in the same essay. I’ll have to check out Notes from No Man’s Land soon!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I finished The Empathy Exams this morning, and I’m hoping to review it later in the week. Some of the essays about the author’s time spent abroad didn’t do much for me, but it mostly was excellent. The collection covers so many subjects, but Jamison manages to connect them all back to empathy.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Really liking The Library Book as well! It’s interesting how Orlean uses the fire as a starting point but goes on to explore the history of libraries and so much more.

      Like

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